Show Terms

Class – 1. A group of rabbits that fall into the same gender, pattern and age group. 2. Age group of the rabbit. Either Junior, Intermediate or Senior

BOB – Best of Breed – Rabbits are judged by breed and the best one determined by judge is BOB.

BOS – Best Opposite Sex – After judge determines the BOB rabbit then judge determines the best of the opposite sex of the BOB rabbit. For example, if a buck wins BOB, then the judge will choose the best doe for the BOS.

BOV – Best Of Variety – The rabbit judged best of its variety. “Variety” is the same as “color” in most breeds. Some breeds only come in one color, and BOV does not apply. “Variety” can mean something else in some breeds, so research your breed.

BOSV – Best Opposite Sex of Variety – Rabbit is judged and the best rabbit of the opposite sex of the BOV rabbit.

BOG – Best Of Group – In some breeds, varieties are lumped together, and shown in groups (Jersey Wooly), or first shown in individual varieties, then the best of each group is chosen (Netherland Dwarf).

BOSG – Best Opposite Sex of Group – Judged the best rabbit of the opposite sex of the BOG rabbit. Best 4-Class – Judged the best rabbit of all the breeds that have four showroom classes. The four classes being: Senior buck, senior doe, junior buck, and junior doe. This is an optional award. Best 6-Class – Judged the best rabbit of all the breeds that have six showroom classes. The six classes being: Senior buck, senior doe, intermediate (also called 6-8) buck, intermediate (also called 6-8) doe, junior buck, and junior doe. Some of these breeds also have a pre-junior class, which is not counted. This is an optional award. BIS – Best In Show – Judged as the best rabbit in the rabbit show. BIS may be chosen by comparing all the BOB winners, or a Best 4-Class and a Best 6-Class may be chosen first, and the BIS chosen from these two winners. Another method, is to designate several groups, with several breeds in each group, choose a Best of each Group, then choose BIS from the group winners. Usually, only very large shows use this method. All shows are required to choose a BIS.

RIS – Reserve In Show – Judged the second best rabbit in the show. This is an optional award. If a Best 4-Class and a Best 6-Class are chosen first, the RIS is the one not chosen for BIS.

Runner-up BIS – Same as RIS. Termonology may be different in different areas of the country. In a 4-H or Non-ARBA Sanctioned Show: Champion – Judged the best rabbit in a certain “group” of rabbits, as designated by the show committee. Rabbits may be grouped by breed, or some other criteria, such as “fancy” and “commercial”, “all other breeds”, “grade”, “meat pen”, “single fryer”, etc. Reserve Champion – Judged the best of the opposite sex of the Champion rabbit. For instance, if a doe wins Champion, then the judge will choose the best buck for the Reserve Champion. Except, in meat pen or single fryer, Reserve Champion is the second place pen or rabbit, regardless of sex. Grand Champion – Judged as the best rabbit in the show, or a certain part of the show. This award is chosen by comparing all of the Champion rabbits. Meat pens and single fryers are usually divided from “breeding” classes, so two or more Grand Champions may be awarded in a show. Reserve Grand Champion – Judged as the best of the opposite sex of the Grand Champion rabbit. Except, in meat pen or single fryer, Reserve Grand Champion is the second place pen or rabbit, regardless of sex. The above terms are common all across the US. But be aware that in 4-H and non-ARBA sanctioned shows, the show sponsor is free to make rules, and award placements as they see fit, so there could be variations.

ARBA Terms:

ARBA – The initials of the American Rabbit Breeders Association, Inc., which promotes rabbits in the United States and foreign countries, provides for licensing of judges and registrars, and publishes a book of standards (The Standard of Perfection) which describes the desired characteristics for each recognized breed.

Grand Champion – A rabbit who has won at least three “Leg” papers (under at least 2 different ARBA judges, and with at least one win as an intermediate or senior), is registered, and has obtained a Grand Champion Certificate, with a Grand Champion number, from ARBA.

Pedigreed – A rabbit who has a written record of at least three generations of ancestors. This information should include name and/or ear number, weight and color, plus any other information available, such as winnings, registration numbers, and Grand Champion numbers. A pedigree form is made out by the breeder of the rabbit. A pedigreed rabbit is usually a purebred, but not necessarily. A pedigeed rabbit usually has a tattoo in its left ear, which corresponds to the ear number on its pedigree paper.

Registered – A rabbit who is purebred, fully pedigreed, has passed the inspection of an ARBA Registrar, and has received a Registration Certificate and number from ARBA. A registered rabbit should have a number or circled “R” tattooed in its right ear.

Leg – An official certificate issued by a Show Secretary, designating a certain win. In all cases, a leg will only be issued if there are at least 5 rabbits competing for that particular win, with at least 3 breeders of those rabbits. A “Leg” may be awarded for First Place in a class, BOB, BOS, BOV, BOSV, BOG, BOSG, or BIS. A rabbit can only get one Leg per show.

Working on Project – help me out?

?I am working on a new project and need some really good pictures of the following breeds.? If you can add some fun facts about the breed then that would be great!

If I choose to use your rabbit pictures, you will get a laminated card with your rabbit on it along with your name, Rabbitry and bunny information.

Please send all quality pictures and information to amandagoodwin2011@gmail.com with header being the breed of your rabbit. Pictures need to be free of clutter in the background and good clear quality. By sending picture to email you are agreeing to give me rights to use them. If you don’t see your breed then that means we already have required information.

Thank you for your interest!

American

American Sable

Angora, French

Angora, Giant

Angora, Satin

Argente Brun

Bevern

Blanc de Hotot

Britannia Petite

Champagne D’ Argent

Checkered Giant

Chinchilla, American

Chinchilla, Giant

Chinchilla, Standard

Cinnamon

Dwarf Hotot

English Spot

Florida White

Holland Lop

Lionhead

Lop, English

Lop, Mini

Mini Rex

Mini Satin

New Zealand

Palomino

Polish

Rex

Satin

Silver

Silver Fox

Silver Marten

Thrianta

No Easter Bunnies here!

“Every year, rabbits are purchased for Easter and then dumped as soon as the ‘cute factor’ takes a backseat to the reality of all that’s required to care for them properly,” “Some are just dumped outside, where they can’t survive and will die from stress, starvation, dehydration, or attacks by predators. Just because rabbits “live” in the wild does NOT mean that domestic rabbits can. They will die a miserable death. PLEASE DON’T DUMP THEM. Others are abandoned at overburdened animal shelters or bounced around from one home to another, where their needs are often misunderstood — so they often end up being sentenced to solitary confinement in a cage and virtually forgotten.

Unfortunately, every year not long after the Easter holiday, shelters are faced with families who adopt a bunny for some springtime fun, only to return the animal later after the season is over. Rabbits can make great pets, but they are not temporary gifts.

Rabbits are social and smart, they crave affection and activity. Most breeds live to be 8 to 12 years old, some even longer. If you are thinking of welcoming a rabbit into your home this Easter, make sure you and your family are ready for this commitment. I get a lot of calls every year with people in a panic because they don’t know what to do. Please make sure that you have proper cage, feed, toys, etc BEFORE you bring an innocent rabbit home.

If your child is begging for an Easter bunny then please buy them a cute stuffed one that doesn’t need fed, water, or groomed and won’t care if it’s tossed in the corner in a few weeks when the new wears off.

With all that being said — If you do want to get a pet bunny then I will be more than to discuss it and help guide you in the right direction AFTER the Easter holiday.

Best Bunny for Me!

So you want a bunny? That is the first step! Next do your research on breeds, there are 49 breeds that are recognized by ARBA. You can find them here.

You need to decide what you are interested in – they come in all different sizes and several of the breeds require special cages and care.

Maybe you want a small bunny. Examples are Dwarf Hotots, Polish, Netherland Dwarfs or even a Britannia Petite. I wouldn’t recommend Britannia Petite for a beginner or someone wanting a laid back bunny. They are like little rockets ready to go!

Maybe you want a medium size bunny like a sweet laid back Dutch or Himalayan? You have meat breeds and fancy to choose from.

Maybe you want a lop eared bunny? Did you know they come in small and large sizes? The large ones have to have very sturdy bottoms on their cages in order to hold their weights.

Maybe you want a fast moving bunny like a Tan, English spot or even a Belgium Hare – Hares have to have solid bottoms on their cages. Running breeds are also not considered cuddle bunnies and are always on the go.

Maybe you want a large bunny? Great examples of them are Giant Chinchillas, English Lops and Flemish. These are usually very gentle giants but they are too big for young children to place on the tables.

Maybe you want something you can groom daily and even use hair to make things. They also come in small to large – Breed examples are Jersey Woolies and Giant Angoras.

Maybe you want to focus and help preserve a rare breed – the list can be found at https://livestockconservancy.org/index.php/heritage/internal/conservation-priority-list#Rabbits

If you still don’t have a clue then I suggest visiting a show (shows can be found on arba.net) . Shows will give you a variety of bunnies to look over and most breeders will be more than happy to give you guidance and explain the ins and outs of their breeds. It also gives you an idea how shows are ran.

Once you get an idea on the breed you want then you need to research it! Don’t just look for all the positive things but also the negative side of that breed. That way you know what you are getting yourself into. Example – Dutch very friendly and easy breeders, Downfall is that they have to have correct markings in order to show so you have to have a place for your culls.

Rabbits are not always easy and don’t always breed like they say. Once you figure out your breed then find a breeder and talk to that breeder – ask them questions and get to really understand that breed. You also want to purchase your starter stock from a reputable breeder. If you start out with crap then you are still feeding crap and you will produce crap. Make sure you start out with Quality animals it will save you a lot of heartache in the end.

Good Luck on your rabbit adventures!

I will be happy to help in anyway that I can and help you find some amazing breeders.

Hope to see you at the show!

 

 

No, you can’t visit my barn

We locked our barn down several years ago. This was done for our animals and our protection. This explains it.

I have asked if I could repost the following and was granted permission. She says it best! The following was borrowed from https://www.facebook.com/meadowmunchers/

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Why animal breeders may not invite you in anymore

You’ve probably read somewhere, maybe even from me, that a breeder that won’t let you see where animals are kept or meet your animals is a big red flag.

That breeders who won’t let you meet the animals or see where they are kept must be hiding something.

Well that’s no longer true

Why you ask?

Because there is a vendetta in the USA right now against breeders, even the really good breeders.

Anti breeder types, be they from HSUS or PETA or other animal rights groups or overzealous animal shelter workers or other similar people are making it their life’s work to get breeders animal seized and stop all breeding.

Many times this involves lying, filing false complaints or worse- setting the breeder up.
Sometimes these people even gain the breeder’s trust or work for them.

No matter how clean your animals are.
No matter how well fed and clean your animals are.
No matter how careful you are to only breed the best and most fully health tested animals
No matter how much time and money you put into them and how much money you lose.

These people are looking to get your dogs seized, to get another “horrible breeder” story in the news, to use you and your animals to get restrictive laws passed.

Breeders now must not only do their absolute best , they now must guard against those that would destroy their life’s work and the animals they love for no reason other than hate.

So the next time an animal breeder grills you with questions, or meets you in their driveway or even at the shopping center in their town, don’t hold it against them – they may just be doing all they can to keep hateful people from destroying all they love.

**Side note — ALWAYS MEET IN PUBLIC PLACE and let someone know who you are meeting. If possible take someone with you.

 

Bunnies won’t breed like Bunnies

Contrary to popular belief – Bunnies don’t always breed like we would like them too. Especially if you are anxiously awaiting a litter. It can become very stressful and dishearten when you can’t get rabbits to breed and have babies.

I have learned a few tricks over the years that have helped me.

  • Add “mother” Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) – 1 Tablespoon per gallon of water. This will help does come on into cycle. We do this with all our bunnies.
  • Put buck into doe cage.
  • If doe isn’t mean then you can leave buck with her for a few days – I don’t care to do this because it can cause injury and you don’t know 100% if they mated or not.
  • Breed on table – position doe and hold while buck mounts.
  • Another trick is to swap cage with buck and doe – leave them in each other’s cages for a few days then place doe with buck.
  • They say Parsley will help fertility but I have not tested that theory.
  • You can also put them in a carrier and drive around town. There is something about traveling that seems to bring them in.
  • Add light so that they have longer “daylight” time during those shorter days.
  • Feed can also play a major role in breeding and fertility.
  • Doe is considered “in” when her vulva is swollen and red. She will normally raise up on back end if you put your hands on her back.
  • Does will also get very testy and grumpy when cycling.
  • Don’t let virgin bucks get tore up by grumpy doe – it will make him shy and leery of breeding.
  • Also make sure that buck has both set of testicles and doesn’t have spit penis.
  • Another thing is to make sure that the rabbits are of appropriate age to breed depending on breed they are.

If you have any tips or questions- Please feel free to comment here. Don’t give up!

What a Leg means in Show terms

Have you ever heard someone say excitedly that their rabbit got a Leg? 

HMMMM – I thought they had four ! You would be right, they do have four limbs. So what is a Leg?

An official certificate issued by a Show Secretary through ARBA sanctioned shows, designating a certain win.  A “Leg” may be awarded for First Place in a class, BOB, BOS, BOV, BOSV, BOG, BOSG, or BIS. A rabbit can only get one Leg per show. To qualify for a leg there are a couple things that must meet the guidelines.

  • Minimum of 3 exhibitors
  • Minimum of 5 rabbits
  • ARBA sanctioned show
  • Must be judged by ARBA licensed Rabbit Judge

Sounds easy right? Not necessarily – If you have 20 rabbits and only 2 exhibitors then no Leg will is awarded. If you have 4 exhibitors and 4 rabbits then no leg can be received. This can be extremely difficult to get on rabbit breeds that are rare or just not as popular as others.

So what do I do with a Leg? Once you get 3 Legs with one being received as a Senior and if rabbit is registered then you can send in for a Grand Champion certificate. A rabbit can only receive one Grand Champion certificate but they can win numerous Legs.

This all helps prove the quality of your rabbits and makes them more valuable. There is also a pride in receiving special awards that rabbits you bred and raise receive.

You don’t have to have a pedigree on your rabbit in order to win a Leg.

You do have to have a pedigree on a rabbit in order to get a Grand Champion certificate and get it registered.

Good Luck and Happy Showing!